Nikon Quote # 302

 

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“Buying a Nikon doesn’t make you a photographer. It makes you a Nikon owner.”

~Author Unknown

“No photographer is as good as the simplest camera.”

~Edward Steichen

My first picture taken with my new camera in the middle of the night.

Finally I entered the wonderful world of the FX. Well, after so much hesitation in March of 2016 I took the plunge and I bought the Nikon D610 ($1300) after another price drop of $200 at B&H with some extra goodies thrown in. My Nikon D200 ($1500) served me  well for 8 years, R.I.P. Compared to the D200 it is amazing to see how much the technology advanced using my new toy, the D610! Shortly I considered to get the Nikon D750 ($2000), however, the only major advantage of the D750 over the D610 is the better focusing mechanism in low light. I decided on to put my hands on the D610 and I couldn’t be happier with my choice. In addition, I saved $700 for another quality lens! Now I have all the time to get familiar with my new toy and get to the proverbial next level with my photography!

Nikon D610 reviews:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikon-d610/13

http://www.dslrbodies.com/cameras/current-nikon-dslr-reviews/nikon-d600-review.html

http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d610.htm

S.O.S.! Which Nikon FX body to buy? #266

The line up of the Nikon DX bodies are far more logical right now than the FX bodies — Good (D3x00), Better (D5x00), Best (D7x00).

In contrast, the Nikon FX bodies are a rather confusing mess. If you buy one body and you’re not in the market for the D4 or D4s, do you buy the D610, the D800, the D800E,  the D810 the Df  or the D750?

More than two years after Nikon introduced  the 36MP Nikon D800 and Nikon D800E, it has consolidated the 800-series with the release of a new camera, the Nikon D810. It is an evolutionary upgrade of the D800 line.  The most significant change is the removal of the optical low-pass filter (OLPF) which means no anti-aliasing and, therefore, sharper images should be a given as a result. Also it has a native sensitivity of ISO 64 and a 9 MP sRaw format.

Enter the 24MP,  51-point AF system, 6.5 fps, tilting LCD screen  Nikon D750 into the picture. Maybe this is my next camera? Perhaps the true replacement of the venerable Nikon D700?  The following site is an excellent early review of Nikon D750.

http://www.rossharvey.com/reviews/nikon-d750-review

Here are the advantages of this camera:

  • Tiny, compared to the D3s
  • Featherlight, compared to the D3s
  • Perfect ergonomic fit and grip for my hands
  • Incredible AF in all light
  • Incredible dynamic range
  • D3s level high ISO ability!
  • Wide exposure compensation range: +/- 5
  • Balances well with 24, 35 and 85 1.4G primes
  • Fast shooting, great buffer with the right card
  • Tilting screen will come in handy
  • Fast Live View
  • SD cards are cheap as chips
  • Excellent User Mode profiles
  • Highly customisable
  • Built-in WiFi (so handy)
  • 2.5K shots on a 64GB card
  • Good battery life (similar to D3s)

Any idea? Which one would you buy?

#71 “The nifty fifty” Nikon 50 mm f/1.8 G (no aphorism)

Little shining star

The new benchmark with an aspherical element

Everyone must have one of this gem

Pros: fast, sharp, silent AF-S with manual override, 1 aspherical element, decent bokeh, great ergonomics, light, cheap, 5 year warranty (just complete & submit the form!)

Cons: 58 mm filter (I don’t use any), plastic, no aperture ring (sight…history in digital age)

This guy outperforms the kit zoom in every respect. Faster (f/1.8), sharper and lighter. This is a must have lens and every photographer ought to have one in his or her bag. Before digital the 50 mm lens had been the standard. The cheap, slow kit zoom lens is the product of the digital era marketing and you give up picture quality for convenience. You learn to take pictures with a 50 mm lens and you use your legs to get closer or further away from your subject. Period.

However, keep in mind that on FX (full frame sensor) it is a standard lens, great for walk around, and on DX (cropped frame sensor) it is a short telephoto lens, perfect for head and shoulder portraits. Then you can buy  the big guns, two fixed aperture zooms, such as a 14-24 mm f/2.8 and a 70-200 mm f/2.8.

Forget the kit zoom. You waste your money. Buy the nifty fifty as your first lens and you will not look back.

I bought mine here:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=nikon+50mm+f%2F1.8g&N=0&InitialSearch=yes&sts=ta

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